Category Archives: Book Reviews

The Moneypenny Diaries

I was lucky to have found a copy of The Moneypenny Diaries: Guardian Angel, by Kate Westbrook, as it’s not even published in the States. I was able to find a fairly inexpensive, used copy on Amazon. But it was obviously published in England. I only found out about it, because I was researching the James Bond novels on Wikipedia. It sounded interesting, so I hunted down a copy.

This was written mainly as journal entries from Jane Moneypenny, the secretary to “M” at MI6, and colleague of James Bond. In the book, her niece, Kate Westbrook (the supposed author of the book), has been sent Moneypenny’s journals many years after her death. Kate learns by reading the journals that her aunt actually worked for the Secret Service. She then tries to find out if the journals are real, and in doing so, proves that Ian Fleming’s Bond novels were based on fact as well.

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The Cylon Secret

Battlestar Galactica: The Cylons’ Secret, by Craig Shaw Gardner was a surprisingly fun book. I had reservations, as it’s been a while since I’ve watched the new show. But with the first chapter I was hooked.

The Cylons’ Secret is a prequel to the new Battlestar Galactica series. It not only gave a little bit of background on a few main characters, but also had an exciting plot.

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Rogue Angel: The Chosen

Rogue Angel: The Chosen, by “Alex Archer” (supposedly, Victor Milan, this month) was another exciting installment. The Chosen certainly didn’t lack for action. There was plenty of fighting and swordplay.

Creed is a part-time archeologist, part-time host of a tv show called Chasing History’s Monsters, and full-time adventurer.

This is the forth book in the Rogue Angel series. This time, Annja goes in search of a mystery surrounding the Santo Nino (Holy Child) sightings, in New Mexico. While on a dig, Annja herself, sees an eerie beast with red eyes that sends her on the quest to seek out an explanation for these strange sightings. Along her journey, she encounters a dangerous and lethal Jesuit priest. But is he a friend or foe?

With plenty of action and suspense, these books are quickly becoming a staple in my library. I read them as soon as I get them. And eHarlequin always releases them a month early!

Related Reviews:
Rogue Angel: The Spider Stone


The Spy Who Loved Me

The Spy Who Loved Me, by Ian Fleming was a short but fun read. As I mentioned yesterday, it was written from “the Bond girl” perspective. Vivienne recalls her upbringing and failures with men for the first half of the book. Then, in the midst of her reverie while managing a closed motel, two gangsters barge in and her nightmare truly begins.

My favorite quote from the book is when Vivienne realizes, “Love of life is born of the awareness of death, of the dread of it.” This suspense is gripping, constantly fearing for Vivienne. Even when James Bond shows up at the door with a flat tire.

I now understand why the movie was nothing like the book, but in name only. The first half of the book was only the drama and heartbreak of Vivienne’s past, and the main story for the rest of the book would have made for a very short movie. It was wonderful as a book though.
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Currently Reading

I’ve started several books but haven’t finished anything lately. The Spy Who Loved Me, by Ian Fleming is a bit unlike his other Bond books, as this one is written from a woman’s perspective. I’m about halfway through this 172-page book, and so far it has just been Vivienne’s back-story – who she is and how she views men. So far, it has been masterfully written and engaging.
I found the book with the cover to the right at Half-Price Bookstore.
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Christmas Candle and Meme

For my third entry in the 2006 G.I.F.T. Challenge, I read The Christmas Candle, by Max Lucado. This was a touching, short story about faith and miracles. Every quarter of a century an angel visits a candle maker’s family, touching a certain candle and miracles happen.

While very short, this was a great little Christmas story that provides more meaning to the season than the usual stories. Max Lucado remains one of my favorite authors for his style of writing and the depth and insight he gives to everyday life.

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Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers, by Linnea Sinclair is another scifi/romance. It’s an action/adventure story with plenty of romance, but in a futuristic space setting.

Captain Elliot and her C-3PO-type droid, named Dezi, find a marooned and unconscious man on a desolate planet. But the rescued man, Rhis, isn’t who he claims to be. And Captain Elliot soon finds herself in the middle of conspiracy and treachery. Elliot seems to trust Rhis even though he has lied to her, simply because she’s attracted to him.

The technical jargon is a bit much, as are Sinclair’s made up words and language. This book might have been easier to read (and not as corny), if she had toned down the bizarre language with so many “z’s” and “v’s.”

On the other hand, her descriptives regarding appearances were seriously lacking. There was an alien species, but I have no idea what they looked like. And no one else, other than the two main characters, was described in any detail either.

Besides my criticisms, there was a good story underneath, though the ending seemed a bit abrupt. As I won this in a giveaway (and know that I won’t be reading this again), I’ll be passing it along to Bookfool. I hope to hear what you think as well.