Category Archives: Book Reviews

Rogue Angel: The Chosen

Rogue Angel: The Chosen, by “Alex Archer” (supposedly, Victor Milan, this month) was another exciting installment. The Chosen certainly didn’t lack for action. There was plenty of fighting and swordplay.

Creed is a part-time archeologist, part-time host of a tv show called Chasing History’s Monsters, and full-time adventurer.

This is the forth book in the Rogue Angel series. This time, Annja goes in search of a mystery surrounding the Santo Nino (Holy Child) sightings, in New Mexico. While on a dig, Annja herself, sees an eerie beast with red eyes that sends her on the quest to seek out an explanation for these strange sightings. Along her journey, she encounters a dangerous and lethal Jesuit priest. But is he a friend or foe?

With plenty of action and suspense, these books are quickly becoming a staple in my library. I read them as soon as I get them. And eHarlequin always releases them a month early!

Related Reviews:
Rogue Angel: The Spider Stone


The Spy Who Loved Me

The Spy Who Loved Me, by Ian Fleming was a short but fun read. As I mentioned yesterday, it was written from “the Bond girl” perspective. Vivienne recalls her upbringing and failures with men for the first half of the book. Then, in the midst of her reverie while managing a closed motel, two gangsters barge in and her nightmare truly begins.

My favorite quote from the book is when Vivienne realizes, “Love of life is born of the awareness of death, of the dread of it.” This suspense is gripping, constantly fearing for Vivienne. Even when James Bond shows up at the door with a flat tire.

I now understand why the movie was nothing like the book, but in name only. The first half of the book was only the drama and heartbreak of Vivienne’s past, and the main story for the rest of the book would have made for a very short movie. It was wonderful as a book though.
Continue reading The Spy Who Loved Me

Currently Reading

I’ve started several books but haven’t finished anything lately. The Spy Who Loved Me, by Ian Fleming is a bit unlike his other Bond books, as this one is written from a woman’s perspective. I’m about halfway through this 172-page book, and so far it has just been Vivienne’s back-story – who she is and how she views men. So far, it has been masterfully written and engaging.
I found the book with the cover to the right at Half-Price Bookstore.
Continue reading Currently Reading

Christmas Candle and Meme

For my third entry in the 2006 G.I.F.T. Challenge, I read The Christmas Candle, by Max Lucado. This was a touching, short story about faith and miracles. Every quarter of a century an angel visits a candle maker’s family, touching a certain candle and miracles happen.

While very short, this was a great little Christmas story that provides more meaning to the season than the usual stories. Max Lucado remains one of my favorite authors for his style of writing and the depth and insight he gives to everyday life.

________________________________________________________
Continue reading Christmas Candle and Meme

Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers, by Linnea Sinclair is another scifi/romance. It’s an action/adventure story with plenty of romance, but in a futuristic space setting.

Captain Elliot and her C-3PO-type droid, named Dezi, find a marooned and unconscious man on a desolate planet. But the rescued man, Rhis, isn’t who he claims to be. And Captain Elliot soon finds herself in the middle of conspiracy and treachery. Elliot seems to trust Rhis even though he has lied to her, simply because she’s attracted to him.

The technical jargon is a bit much, as are Sinclair’s made up words and language. This book might have been easier to read (and not as corny), if she had toned down the bizarre language with so many “z’s” and “v’s.”

On the other hand, her descriptives regarding appearances were seriously lacking. There was an alien species, but I have no idea what they looked like. And no one else, other than the two main characters, was described in any detail either.

Besides my criticisms, there was a good story underneath, though the ending seemed a bit abrupt. As I won this in a giveaway (and know that I won’t be reading this again), I’ll be passing it along to Bookfool. I hope to hear what you think as well.

The Book Thief

One of the books I read over Thanksgiving break was The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak. My sister kept teasing me because I was crying. As I told her, I think the only book I cried more through was while reading The Notebook.

The Book Thief is narrated by death and centers on a little girl in Germany during World War II. Even without reading other reviews, I knew this was going to be an emotional book. While it was quite long, it was cleverly written and easy to read.

Many people have stated this was their favorite read of the year. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for a couple reasons. One, this was published as a young adult book, but the profanity was beyond ridiculous. I might not have minded one or two instances, but throughout the whole novel: I would not recommend it to a youth. And second, it was just a little bit too long. Several things could have been cut out. It seemed to drag in places, like the neverending story. I guess after having read The Hiding Place, by Corrie Ten Boom, it would be hard to measure up.

It was still a great and powerful story. But instead of recommending The Book Thief, I’d have to recommend The Hiding Place (even more powerful, being a true story).

Diagnosis Murder: The Double Life

Diagnosis Murder #7: The Double Life, by Lee Goldberg is the seventh installment in the Diagnosis Murder series. Dr. Mark Sloan awakens from an accident to find that two years of his life have passed of which he has no memory.

Goldberg’s Diagnosis Murder novels are based from the hit TV show of the same name, for which Goldberg also wrote and produced. Dr. Sloan is the Chief of Staff at Community General Hospital in Los Angeles. In his spare time, Sloan solves mysteries and tracks down murderers, with the help of his son Steve (a homicide detective) and fellow doctors Amanda Bentley and Jessie Travis.

This book was nearly impossible to put down. I ended up reading it in one day. The murder mystery was very fast-paced and had a lot going on, but not so much that it became confusing. Goldberg weaves a complex mystery full of murders and puzzles. As always, he gives Dr. Sloan so much depth, emotion, and humor that you can imagine Dick Van Dyke playing the part on TV. Goldberg has proved once again that he is a master of writing whodunits.

Besides writing Diagnosis Murder books, Lee Goldberg also writes original stand-alone novels and novels from the Monk TV series (starring Tony Shalhoub on USA). Check out Goldberg’s website for a complete list of his books.


On another note, I want to wish my friend Carl a very Happy Birthday!
Enjoy your day of watching many hours of Lord of the Rings!