Tag Archives: scifi

SciFi Book Review: Star Wars: Battlefront II: Inferno Squad

Star Wars: Battlefront II: Inferno Squad by Christie Golden

Synopsis:
After the humiliating theft of the Death Star plans and the destruction of the battle station, the Empire is on the defensive. But not for long. In retaliation, the elite Imperial soldiers of Inferno Squad have been called in for the crucial mission of infiltrating and eliminating the Partisans—the rebel faction once led by notorious Republic freedom fighter Saw Gerrera.

Following the death of their leader, the Partisans have carried on his extremist legacy, determined to thwart the Empire—no matter the cost. Now Inferno Squad must prove its status as the best of the best and take down the Partisans from within. But the growing threat of being discovered in their enemy’s midst turns an already dangerous operation into a do-or-die acid test they dare not fail. To protect and preserve the Empire, to what lengths will Inferno Squad go . . . and how far beyond them?

Review:
Iden Versio survived the destruction of the Death Star and is assigned to the elite Inferno Squad running Special Ops for the Empire. They often have to let their morals slide to further their goals. But when they’re asked to infiltrate a Partisan group who have taken up Saw Gerrara’s cause, each individual of the Inferno Squad will be tested.

This latest Star Wars novel is a new favorite. Christie Golden is a master at tie-in novels. And this Inferno Squad is a great example of her fantastic character development and fleshing out a well-established universe. Iden Versio is a wonderfully complex character. I love that this story is written from the point of view of characters who follow the Empire and believe in what it stands for. Yet, readers will sympathize at times. This original story is full of suspense, drama, and exciting intrigue. And the climactic, surprising ending does not disappoint. I would love to read further adventures of the Inferno Squad.

REALIVE Trailer

REALIVE was written and directed by Mateo Gil (Vanilla Sky original film Abre Los Ojos, The Sea Inside) and features a talented cast including Tom Hughes (About Time, London Town), Charlotte Le Bon (The Walk, The Hundred-Foot Journey), Oona Chaplin (Taboo, “Game of Thrones”) and Barry Ward (The Fall, The Journey).

Syfy Films will be releasing REALIVE in Theaters on September 29, 2017 and on VOD and Digital HD on October 3, 2017.

SYNOPSIS: Marc is diagnosed with a disease and is given a short time to live. Unable to accept his own end, he decides to freeze his body. Sixty years later, in the year 2084, he becomes the first cryogenically frozen man to be revived in history. Marc discovers a startling future, but the biggest surprise is that his past has accompanied him in unexpected ways.

Fantasy Book Review: Besieged

Besieged by Kevin Hearne

Synopsis:
In ancient Egypt, Atticus agrees to raid a secret chamber underneath the library of Alexandria, dodging deadly traps, only to learn that on-site security includes two members of the Egyptian pantheon.

At a Kansas carnival, fun and games turns to murder and mayhem, thanks to soul-snatching demons and flesh-craving ghouls luring visitors into an all-too-real house of horrors.

Verily, in olde England, striking up a friendship with William Shakespeare lands both Atticus and the Bard in boiling hot water with a trio of infamous witches.

During the Gold Rush, the avatar of greed himself turns the streets of San Francisco red with blood and upsets the elemental Sequoia. Atticus may have to fight fire with fire if he’s going to restore balance.

Review:
I’m not usually one to read a lot of short stories. But I’ve read this entire series, so I decided to indulge and let this collection tide me over until the next full novel installment. There is a great variety of stories from several character’s point of views. Each story is very short, and we’re given a short description where each story falls in the timeline and the character it involves. I really liked the majority of these, the first set of stories in particular – ancient Egypt, the Gold Rush, Shakespeare, and the carnival (all mentioned above) set a fantastic tone. However, a strange story involving BDSM felt really out of place. And a couple, I ended up skimming as the plots didn’t engage me. But with nine short stories, this was a mostly-solid set of fun and exciting stories with some fantastic characters that fans of the series should enjoy. The final story has a nice lead-in to the next novel involving Loki and Ragnarok.

Graphic Novel Review: The Lost Boys Vol. 1

The Lost Boys Vol. 1 by Tim Seeley

Synopsis:
Welcome to scenic Santa Carla, California. Great beaches. Colorful characters. Killer nightlife. And, of course, all the damn vampires.

The Emerson brothers (Sam and Michael) and the Frog brothers (Edgar and Alan) learned that last part the hard way—these underage slayers took on the vampire master Max and his pack of punked-out minions, and drove a stake right through their plans to suck Santa Carla dry. After scraping the undead goo off their shoes, they figured everything was back to normal.

But now there are new vamps in town.

A coven of female undead called the Blood Belles has moved in, and they’ve targeted Sam, Michael, the Frog Brothers, and every other vampire hunter in Santa Carla for bloody vengeance.

It’ll take every trick in the brothers’ monster-killing book to stop these bloodsuckers from unleashing an entire army of the damned. And they’ll need help from an unexpected source—a certain shirtless sax-playing savior known only as the Believer!

Review:
This story pics up not long after the ’87 film ends. Sam Emerson is working at video store and his brother Michael at a nursing home. The Frog brothers continue to try to hone their skills as vampire hunters.

When the Emerson’s grandfather is involved in an accident, the boys know that vampires are involved. And it’s time hunt the vicious undead once again. This new story feels a lot like the original movie, with plenty of humor and suspense. The artwork looked great, with sharp lines and a dark mood. Though, it did bother me that none of the boys looked anything like the actors from the film, so it was really hard to tell who was who. These fantastic characters makes The Lost Boys standout among other vampire series. I hope to see these comics continue in the future, as Seeley did a fantastic job with the characters and developed an original, exciting story.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2 Released Today and Bonus Clips!

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2 is out today on 4K UHD & Blu-ray! To celebrate, here are some Rocket and Groot bonus clips that shows behind the scenes glimpse of what it was like designing and creating the phenominal digital characters of Rocket and Groot on set alongside the other actors.

Rocket & Groot

Baby Groot Stand-In

Designing Baby Groot

Rocket In The Trees

Book Excerpt and Giveaway: The Brightest Fell

blog tour

Excerpt from The Brightest Fell:

one
October 9th, 2013
Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell .—William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

THE FETCH IS ONE of the most feared and least understood figures in Faerie. Their appearance heralds the approach of inescapable death: once the Fetch shows up, there’s nothing that can be done. The mechanism that summons them has never been found, and they’ve always been rare, with only five conclusively identified in the last century. They appear for the supposedly significant—kings and queens, heroes and villains—and they wear the faces of the people they have come to escort into whatever awaits the fae beyond the borders of death. They are temporary, transitory, and terrifying.

My Fetch, who voluntarily goes by “May Daye,” because nothing says “I am a serious and terrible death omen” like having a pun for a name, showed up more than three years ago. She was supposed to foretell my impending doom. Instead, all she managed to foretell was me getting a new roommate. Life can be funny that way.

Continue reading Book Excerpt and Giveaway: The Brightest Fell

Blu-Ray Review Copy: King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

Synopsis:
When the child Arthur’s father is murdered, Vortigern (Jude Law), Arthur’s uncle, seizes the crown. Robbed of his birthright and with no idea who he truly is, Arthur comes up the hard way in the back alleys of the city. But once he pulls the sword from the stone, his life is turned upside down and he is forced to acknowledge his true legacy…whether he likes it or not.

Review:
The film opens to an exciting battle where Mordred is attacking Camelot with giant elephants the size of a small mountain. But Uther (Arthur’s father – played by Eric Bana) defends his kingdom with the legendary Excalibur. But when Uther’s own brother betrays him, Arthur must flee.

There are some humorous montages of Arthur growing up and battles along the way to retake Camelot that director Guy Ritchie is known for – rock music paired with scenes on fast-forward. It’s a bit too cheesy for a film set in the middle ages. I really wanted to like this film. But the story has just been done so many times. The story was nothing new and wasn’t memorable at all. It’s too bad because the cast was fantastic. But nothing can save an uninspired script with a story we have heard in many, MANY different ways.

Special Features Include:
– Arthur with Swagger
– Sword from the Stone
– Parry and Bleed
– Building on the Past
– Inside the Cut: The Action of King Arthur
– Camelot in 93 Days
– Legend of Exalibur
– Scenic Scotland

SciFi Book Review: Replica

Replica by Lauren Oliver

Synopsis:
Lyra’s story begins in the Haven Institute, a building tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida that from a distance looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth, Haven is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed. When a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects—Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72—manage to escape.

Gemma has been in and out of hospitals for as long as she can remember. A lonely teen, her life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April. But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family’s past and discovers her father’s mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two replicas and a completely new set of questions.

Review:
Lyra and a fellow clone escape their facility only to learn horrifying truths about their pasts. Gemma helps Lyra and 24 escape, and finds herself in the middle of more danger than she could imagine.

Replica is a unique and fascinating story told from two different characters’ points of view. It’s the first in a YA scifi duology. It’s a flip book, as one side of the book is Lyra’s story, and you flip the book over to start reading Gemma’s which ends in the middle of the book. The pacing is steady and flows well – even when we switch to Gemma’s side, it doesn’t get repetitive. Full of suspense, intrigue, drama, and a bit of romance – this is an exciting thriller that I won’t soon forget.