Tag Archives: scifi

Book Review: The Art of Ready Player One

The Art of Ready Player One by Gina McIntyre (Author),‎ Ernest Cline (Introduction),‎ Steven Spielberg (Foreword)

Movie Synopsis:
Our dystopian world lies on the brink of chaos and collapse, but the people have found their salvation in the OASIS, an expansive virtual reality universe created by the brilliant and eccentric James Halliday. When Halliday dies, he leaves his immense fortune in the form of a digital Easter egg hidden somewhere in the OASIS, sparking a contest that grips the entire world.

Review:
Fans of the film will enjoy this deeper look into the amazing work that went into creating this immense digital world. I love to look at early artwork and sketches of characters and scenes – and this is an impressive collection.

Movie Spoilers Ahead:
Continue reading Book Review: The Art of Ready Player One

Movie News: SYFY’s Hover

SYFY FILMS RELEASES ‘HOVER’
In Theaters June 29 and on VOD and Digital HD July 3
NEW YORK – April 18, 2018 – SYFY Films today announces the release of the upcoming film HOVER, in theaters on June 29, 2018 and on VOD and Digital HD on July 3, 2018. Directed by Matt Osterman (400 DAYS, “Ghost from the Machine”), the science fiction film marks the feature screenwriting debut of Cleopatra Coleman (“The Last Man on Earth,” “White Famous”). The cast includes Coleman, Shane Coffey (“Pretty Little Liars,” “Sugar Mountain”), Craig muMs Grant (“Oz,” “Birdman”), Beth Grant (“The Mindy Project,” “No Country for Old Men”), Fabianne Therese (“Teenage Cocktail,” “Southbound”) and Rhoda Griffis (“Walk the Line,” “The Blind Side”).

HOVER takes place in the near future, where environmental strain has caused food shortages around the world. Technology provides a narrow path forward, with agricultural drones maximizing the yield from what land remains. Two compassionate care providers, Claudia (Coleman) and her mentor John (Craig muMs Grant), work to assist sick farmland inhabitants in ending their lives. After John dies under mysterious circumstances, a group of locals helps Claudia to uncover a deadly connection between the health of her clients and the technology they are using.

HOVER is produced by Travis Stevens of Snowfort Pictures (“Jodorowsky’s Dune,” “We Are Still Here”) and Claire Haley.

For more information on the film, please https://www.facebook.com/HoverMovie2018

SciFi Book Review: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: 2 Fuzzy, 2 Furious

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: 2 Fuzzy, 2 Furious by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale

Synopsis:
Doreen Green, age fourteen, is a little too busy wiping out crime in her suburban New Jersey neighborhood to focus on her overdue homework. That’s because she also happens to be Squirrel Girl, a bushy-tailed, squirrel-powered Super Hero! After foiling the nefarious plot of an amateur Super Villain, Squirrel Girl is finally finding her groove–and group texting with the Avengers, like, all the time. Doreen, on the other hand, is still trying to navigate friendships, evil teachers, and all the pitfalls that come with middle school. (Seriously, it’s complicated.)

An announcement goes out that sends waves of excitement through the community: There’s a new mall opening on the border of Shady Oaks and neighboring town Listless Pines, and they all get to vote on the mall’s mascot! Everyone goes wild over the election . . . a little too wild, if you ask Squirrel Girl and her BHFF (Best Human Friend Forever), Ana Sofia. Soon the two towns are at war–even the trusty Squirrel Scouts are going berserk. Is there something sinister at work in Shady Oaks? Something that has less to do with quality shopping choices and more to do with world domination? And will Squirrel Girl be able to unleash the furry paws of justice in time to save the day?

Review:
Doreen, AKA Squirrel Girl, picks up not long after the last novel – she now has a best friend and even groupies. But she has a teacher who seems to hate her for some reason. And the new mall coming in seems nefarious. It even has a logo that looks suspiciously like a hydra.

This latest Squirrel Girl story is just as fun and exciting as before. The story is told from multiple points of view – Squirrel Girl, Ana Sofia, and even Tippy Toe the squirrel. The highlight is always the conversations that Squirrel Girl has with the Avengers via text and also the random chatroom rants. Squirrel Girl is incredibly powerful, but she’s also the sweetest and most innocent superhero. This story is full of humor, mystery, adventure, and crazy characters. I love the quirky, Squirrel Girl comics, and these novels make for a perfect series for middle readers on up.

SciFi Book Review: The Final Six

The Final Six by Alexandra Monir

Synopsis:
When Leo and Naomi are drafted, along with twenty-two of the world’s brightest teenagers, into the International Space Training Camp, their lives are forever changed. Overnight, they become global celebrities in contention for one of the six slots to travel to Europa—Jupiter’s moon—and establish a new colony, leaving their planet forever. With Earth irreparably damaged, the future of the human race rests on their shoulders.

For Leo, an Italian championship swimmer, this kind of purpose is a reason to go on after losing his family. But Naomi, an Iranian-American science genius, is suspicious of the ISTC and the fact that a similar mission failed under mysterious circumstances, killing the astronauts onboard. She fears something equally sinister awaiting the Final Six beneath Europa’s surface.

Review:
Leo is alone in the world after the death of his family. In fact, he has nothing else to live for, when suddenly he is chosen to compete for a chance at heading to the stars. Meanwhile, Naomi has a wonderful family that doesn’t want to leave, especially with what she knows about the chances of the Final Six who will be chosen.

The Final Six is an exciting, science fiction novel for young adults. The story is told from both Leo and Naomi’s view points, alternating chapters. The characters are well-developed and the pacing is solid. The majority of the story is the competition at NASA to narrow down the young adults to the best choices to represent humanity – with thrilling challenges a possible psychopath bent on sabotage. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel – with plenty of intrigue, danger, suspense, and a bit of romance. Events build to a surprising finale and a big cliffhanger as the kids head to space. This sequel can’t come soon enough. And it’s no wonder that it’s been optioned for film already.

SciFi Book Review: Thunderhead

Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman

Synopsis:
The Thunderhead cannot interfere in the affairs of the Scythedom. All it can do is observe—it does not like what it sees.

A year has passed since Rowan had gone off grid. Since then, he has become an urban legend, a vigilante snuffing out corrupt scythes in a trial by fire. His story is told in whispers across the continent.

As Scythe Anastasia, Citra gleans with compassion and openly challenges the ideals of the “new order.” But when her life is threatened and her methods questioned, it becomes clear that not everyone is open to the change.

Review:
Rowan has become a vigilante, ending Scythes who are corrupt and abuse their power. Whereas Scythe Anastasia (formerly Citra) has become a force for good from within the Scythedom. But someone is not happy with her ideals and sympathetic ways. The Thunderhead, the almost-omniscient AI, knows about the danger threatening Scythe Anastasia, but since it can’t directly interfere – it must become creative.

Thunderhead is the second installment in the Arc of a Scythe series. Once again, the strengths of this story is the incredible characters and fantastic worldbuilding. The different points of view paired with intense suspense, pulls the reader right into the story. This sequel is a much different story, yet just as dramatic and exciting. It’s unpredictable and builds to a cliffhanger ending this time. These novels have impressed me so much that I’m definitely going to read more from this author. And the next in this series can’t come soon enough.

Box Review: TeeBlox – March 2018

TeeBlox

TeeBlox is a t-shirt subscription service that brings 100% authentic licensed geek and gamer shirts to your doorsteps every month. No hidden fees. Cancel anytime. Satisfaction Guaranteed.”

Get 1 shirt and 2 other items starting at $12.99/mo and use code: SCIFICHICK24 to get 24% off your first month!

Subscribers can pick from the following categories: SciFi, Marvel, DC Comics, Cartoons, Movies and TV, Games, Hot Meex, or Disney!

*SciFiChick.com received a box for review purposes.

Continue reading Box Review: TeeBlox – March 2018

Fantasy Book Review: Wizard for Hire

Wizard for Hire by Obert Skye

Synopsis:
Fourteen-year-old Ozzy lives near Portland, Oregon, and is desperate for help. His scientist parents have been kidnapped after discovering a formula that enables mind control. Their work was so top secret Ozzy is afraid to go to the police, but without help, he fears he’ll never find his parents. Then he stumbles across a classified ad in the local newspaper that says “Wizard for Hire. Call 555-SPEL.” Ozzy has read about wizards in books like Harry Potter, but wizards couldn’t actually exist today, could they? After Ozzy meets the wizard Labyrinth–aka Rin–he’s even more skeptical.

Sure, Rin dresses like a wizard, but the short robe and high-top tennis shoes seem unorthodox, as does Rin’s habit of writing notes on his shoes and eating breakfast for every meal. Plus, Rin doesn’t even cast any magic spells, which means that the unexplained coincidences that start happening around Ozzy are just that–coincidences.

With the help of a robotic-talking raven invented by Ozzy’s father, a kind and curious girl at school who decides to help Ozzy, and, of course, a self-proclaimed wizard who may or may not have a magical wand, Ozzy begins an unforgettable quest that will lead him closer to the answers he desperately seeks about his missing parents.

Review:
Ozzy has lived alone in his home in the woods for years, after his parents were kidnapped. When he sees and ad for a Wizard for Hire, Ozzy seeks the wizard’s help in finding what happened to his parents. Rin doesn’t act or look like the wizards Ozzy has read about, but he’s the one person Ozzy can trust.

Wizard for Hire isn’t exactly a fantasy story, as there isn’t really any magic – other than an intelligent, mechanical bird. This middle grade novel has some wonderfully, colorful characters. While the story starts out a bit slow, as Ozzy grows up on his own and tries to go to school, there is a lot of fantastic character development. And there is still plenty of humor, mystery, adventure, and suspense as the story continues. I thoroughly enjoyed this start to a new series. And I appreciated that there wasn’t a cliffhanger ending and that the story seemed mostly wrapped up. But these characters are a lot of fun, which readers will love to read more about.

Received in March

The following are the books, movies, television shows, etc. I received last month for review and/or giveaways:

Blu-Rays / DVD:
Justice League 4K Blu-Ray

Mystery Boxes:
TeeBlox
Bam Box

Amazon Press / 47North:
Bandwidth by Eliot Peper

Avon Press:
Twice Bitten by Lynsay Sands

Del Rey:
The Memory of Fire by Callie Bates
Star Wars: The Last Jedi: Expanded Edition by Jason Fry
Kill the Farm Boy by Kevin Hearne

Disney Hyperion:
Burning Magic by Joshua Khan
The Life and Death Parade by Eliza Wass
Chasing Helicity by Ginger Zee
The Storm Runner by J. C. Cervantes
Star Wars: The Last Jedi Star Wars: The Last Jedi Read-Along Storybook & CD by Elizabeth Schaefer
Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rose and Finn’s Secret Mission by Ella Patrick
World of Reading Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rey’s Journey (Level 2 Reader) by Ella Patrick

Harper Voyager:
Awakened by James S Murray

Hex Publishers:
Denver Moon: The Minds of Mars by Warren Hammond
Denver Moon Issues 1 and 2

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt / HMH Teen:
Brightly Burning by Alexa Donne
The Stone Girl’s Story by Sarah Beth Durst
Isle of Blood and Stone by Makiia Lucier
Your One & Only by Adrianne Finlay

Macmillan Childrens / Feiwel and Friends / First Second:
Wires and Nerve, Volume 2: Gone Rogue by Marissa Meyer
The Adventure Zone: Here There Be Gerblins by Clint McElroy

Night Shade Books:
Bash Bash Revolution by Douglas Lain

Pocket Books:
Star Trek: Voyager: Architects of Infinity by Kirsten Beyer

Pyr:
The Last Sun by K. D. Edwards

Scholastic:
A Night Divided by Jennifer A. Nielsen

Shadow Mountain:
Wizard for Hire by Obert Skye

Soho Press:
Plum Rains by Andromeda Romano-Lax

Subterranean Press:
The Future Is Blue by Catherynne M. Valente
A Voice in the Night by Jack McDevitt

Titan Books:
The Rig by Roger Levy

Tor:
Game of the Gods by Jay Schiffman
The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal
Head On by John Scalzi